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Turn an old router into a Wi-Fi repeater

Turn an old router into a Wi-Fi repeater

Turn an old router into a Wi-Fi repeater

Switch to 5GHz

A problem you may not have previously considered is the frequency your router operates on. If you simply pulled it out of the box, installed it and never looked back, you probably grazed over the dropdown box that let you choose between 2.4GHz and 5GHz.

If you have a ton of electronics in your home, the 2.4GHz spectrum can get pretty crowded. A former colleague at Pocketnow, Joe Levi, explains that Bluetooth devices, wireless peripherals and even some microwaves cause a lot of noise in the 2.4GHz spectrum.

To cut down on the noise and drop-offs, consider switching your router to 5GHz in the administrator panel. If the option for both 2.4GHz and 5GHz is there, opt for that.

Use a less crowded channel

If you live in a crowded neighborhood or in an apartment and share a lot of the same signal space with your neighbors, choosing the right channel can cut down on interference and help speed things up a bit.

For starters, channels 1, 6 and 11 are most frequently used in the 2.4GHz spectrum, as they are the only three channels that do not overlap one another. If you’ve switched to 5GHz, you have whole host of channels to choose from. The selection of channels varies by model.

You can use an application like Wifi Analyzer on Android or WifiInfoView on Windows to analyze the nearby wireless signals and see which channels are being used the most. Mac has this functionality built in. Simply hold option and click the Wi-Fi icon in the menu bar, then select Open Wireless Diagnostics.

It’s worth nothing that many newer routers will automatically choose the least crowded channel upon rebooting, so pulling the plug may also switch the channel to a less crowded one.

Upgrade your router

If you’re paying for fast home Internet and feel like you’re not getting what you’re paying for, the hardware on your end may be serving as a bottleneck.

If it’s been several years since you purchased your router (or modem/router combo), it’s probably time to upgrade. Wireless and Internet technology have changed a great deal in the last decade, and many routers 5 or more years old do not support newer technology, such as Internet speeds in excess of 100Mbps.

The easiest way to determine if your router is the culprit is to look up the model number and compare its specs with those of the Internet package from your ISP.

Powerline network adapters are almost always the better option to extend your wireless network’s reach. However, they won’t work across separate circuits.

When you need to extend your network and power line network adapters won’t do, the next best option is to put your old router to use and turn it into a wireless bridge. This is rather involved and will usually require you to install custom firmware on your router. Not to mention, the network speeds will be dramatically cut. But it might be the only way — short of running a wire — to get Wi-Fi on the outer limits or your property.

Last resort: Contact your ISP

If all else fails, consider calling your ISP. Yes, it’s usually one of the most unpleasant things you can do with your time, but it could save you hours, days or weeks of future frustration.

If you’ve upgraded your Internet package and you’re using hardware supplied by your service provider, they can get the right hardware in your hands. Time Warner Cable, for instance, recently rolled out its TWC MAXX upgrades in parts of Charlotte, North Carolina, which call https://rapidloan.net/installment-loans-ca/ for upgraded hardware. Without a newer modem and router, you may not experience the full effects of the free upgrade.

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